Lest we forget

Jasper Jens Iverson

Jasper Jens Iverson (1889-1917)

Jasper Jens Iverson
(1889-1917)

Son of: Mary (nee McLean, formerly Mulcahy) and Jens Iverson

Brother of: John Roscoe (Jack) Mulcahy, Hugh McLean Mulcahy, Donald Mulcahy, David Matthew Mulcahy, Ellen Iverson, Donald Iverson, Finlay Iverson, Mary (Pollie) Iverson, Kenneth Ross Iverson, Alfred Iverson

Service Number: 2715A

Rank: Private

Unit: 9th Australian Infantry Battalion

Service: Australian Army

Conflict: First World War, 1914-1918

Date of death: 04 October 1917

Place of death: Belgium

Cause of death: Died of wounds

Age at death: 28

Place of association: Urbenville, Australia

Cemetery or memorial details: Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, Flanders, Belgium

Source: AWM145 Roll of Honour cards, 1914-1918 War, Army

 

Donald Joseph Maloney (1890-1917)

Donald Joseph Maloney
(1890-1917)

Donald Joseph Maloney

Son of: Ann (nee McLean) and Edward Maloney

Brother of: Edward Matthew Maloney, David Ross Maloney, Charlotte Catherine Maloney

Service Number: 419

Rank: Private

Unit: 42nd Australian Infantry Battalion

Service: Australian Army

Conflict: First World War, 1914-1918

Date of death: 31 July 1917

Place of death: Belgium

Cause of death: Killed in action

Place of association: Woodenbong, Australia

Cemetery or memorial details: Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, Flanders, Belgium

Source: AWM145 Roll of Honour cards, 1914-1918 War, Army

 

Finlay Urquhart

Jasper Iverson's  great-niece places a poppy next to his name on the Roll of Honour, Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

Jasper Iverson’s great-great-niece places a poppy next to his name on the Roll of Honour, Australian War Memorial, Canberra.

Son of: Margaret (nee McLean) and Hugh Urquhart

Brother of: Catherine Anne Marion Urquhart, Alexander William Urquhart, Hugh Kenneth Urquhart, Margaret Louisa (Lulu) Urquhart, Thomas Malcolm Urquhart, Bertha Urquhart, Isabella Ross Urquhart, Caroline (Carrie) Urquhart

Service Number: 2423

Rank: Private

Unit: 15th Australian Infantry Battalion

Service: Australian Army

Conflict: First World War, 1914-1918

Date of death: 11 April 1917

Place of death: France

Age at death: 31

Place of association: Mummulgum, Australia

Cemetery or memorial details: Villers-Bretonneux Memorial, Villers-Bretonneux, Picardie, France

Source: AWM145 Roll of Honour cards, 1914-1918 War, Army

 

Reuben Smith

Reuben Smith  (1891-1917)

Reuben Smith
(1891-1917)

Son of: Eliza Jane (nee Merchant) and George Smith

Brother of: George Smith, Samuel Smith, Mary Ann Smith, Rose Hannah Smith, James Smith, Hannah Louisa Smith, Matilda (Tilly) Smith, Emma Eliza Smith, Edward George Smith, Ellen Smith, Phyllis Phoebe Smith, Henrietta Smith, Agnes Smith

Service Number: 4540

Rank: Lance Corporal

Unit: 25th Australian Infantry Battalion

Service: Australian Army

Conflict: First World War, 1914-1918

Date of death: 03 February 1917

Place of death: France

Cause of death: Killed in action

Age at death: 24

Place of association: Pretty Gully, Australia

Cemetery or memorial details: Martinpuich British Cemetery, Picardie, France

Source: AWM145 Roll of Honour cards, 1914-1918 War, Army

 

Photos below:

By Markus3 (Marc ROUSSEL) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

By Johan Bakker (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Menin Gate Memorial

Menin Gate Memorial

Villers-Brettoneux Australian Memorial

Villers-Brettoneux Australian Memorial

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Jens and Jacob

Jens Jasper Iverson and Jacob C.W. Nielsen were good friends.  They sailed the seas together, jumped ship together and lived and worked together for 60 years.

Jens Iverson

Jens Iverson

 

For the rest of their lives, Jacob followed Jens’ example.  Although Jacob was the elder, he would buy exactly the same things Jens bought. Jacob even bought the same size clothing, although Jens was much taller.

Jacob Nielsen

Jacob Nielsen

The only thing Jacob couldn’t match Jens in was a wife. Jens married my great-grandmother, Mary Mulcahy (nee McLean) in 1885. She was a widow with three young boys who must have been glad of the security another marriage offered.  Jens and Mary made a home at “Swallows’ Nest” on the banks of Tooloom Creek in northern New South Wales and Jacob lived on their property for the rest of his life, outliving Jens by seven years and living until he was 100.

Jens and Mary Iverson with their children and Jens' friend Jacob Neilsen c1896

Jens and Mary Iverson with their children and Jens’ friend Jacob Neilsen c1896

Jacob had been jilted by his fiancée and he wore the ring he had bought for her.  Did he never marry because he remained heartbroken and found no one who could measure up to her or was it the shortage of women in the area which caused his continuing single status?

Jens, Mary and Jacob lived a very settled existence, working hard on “Swallows’ Nest” to survive as subsistence farmers and to raise the £5 lease payment which was due each year.

The kitchen had walls and floors of slab and an open fireplace where Mary cooked with a camp oven.  The pantry, eight feet wide and the length of the house, was lined with shelves of preserves.  Mary’s grandchildren remembered that as children they would run to see Grannie’s pantry as soon as they arrived for a visit.

There was a large orchard with stone fruits, grapes, citrus, quinces, pomegranates, Japanese raisins, mulberries, persimmons, apples and pears.  Corn was interplanted with melons and pumpkins.  It was ground for porridge and corn bread and used to feed the fowls.  They grew their own arrowroot and tobacco.  Watering was by bucket from the creek but there were no fruit flies or other pests to contend with as these had not yet arrived in the area.

Jens Iversons tobacco licence

Evidence of Jens Iverson’s tobacco licence

There were cows for milk, cheese and butter for the family and some butter for sale.  They always kept a couple of pigs to slaughter in winter and then cured the pork for hams and bacon.  They ran 25 sheep and may have sold some wool.

Any supplies which they could not produce came by bullock wagon from Boonah twice a year.

Was this the life Jens and Jacob had in mind when they deserted their ship, the “Theresa”, when it was in port in Sydney in 1863?

Crew list of the "Theresa" on arrival in Sydney, <arch 1863.

Crew list of the “Theresa” on arrival in Sydney,

Did they dream of life on the land or were they hoping to strike it rich on the goldfields?  While the first flush of the gold rush was over, there were still discoveries being made on a regular basis.  Although the “Theresa” was not a passenger ship, they must have noticed the wave of immigrants arriving in Australia. Perhaps the life of a Danish seaman was not a happy one.  Family stories say that Jens’ brother, Peter, jumped ship in America.

Jens’ final resting place in Warwick, Queensland, was a long way from his birthplace in Denmark.